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May 13, 2020

The term "microbiome" has become widely used in recent years as people devotedly devour kimchi, kefir, and kombucha in an attempt to improve their digestion, depression, and blood pressure. Indeed, we now know that the trillions of microbes--viruses, bacteria, and fungi--that live on our skin and in our guts, lungs, and reproductive organs, among other places, play critical roles in our well-being.

A team of researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences examined the long-term impact of soybean diseases on production in the U.S.  IMAGE: LYNN BETTS/USDA
April 16, 2020

Economic losses due to soybean diseases in the United States from 1996 to 2016 amounted to more than $95 billion, according to a team of researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences who examined the long-term impact of soybean diseases on production in the U.S.

IMAGE: ALYSSA COLLINS
March 18, 2020

Pesticide-coated seeds — such as neonicotinoids, many of which are highly toxic to both pest and beneficial insects — are increasingly used in the major field crops, but are underreported, in part, because farmers often do not know what pesticides are on their seeds, according to an international team of researchers. The lack of data may complicate efforts to evaluate the value of different pest management strategies, while also protecting human health and the environment.

Marilyn J. Roossinck
February 20, 2020

You may sometimes have felt like you “have come down with a virus,” meaning that you became sick from being exposed to something that could have been a virus. In fact, you have a virus – actually, many – all the time. Some viruses cause the common cold, and some are crucial to human survival. New viruses can also emerge, and they typically create illness in humans when they have very recently jumped from another species to humans. As world health leaders try to determine how to respond to the new coronavirus, virus expert Marilyn J. Roossinck answers a few questions.

Crabapple blossoms at the Penn State University Park campus. IMAGE: SARA KLEE
January 15, 2020

A publication from the lab of Timothy McNellis, associate professor in the Department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology, was recently featured on “This Week in Microbiology,” a podcast produced by the American Society for Microbiology.

IMAGE: PENN STATE
November 25, 2019

In the 6th episode of the Reach podcast, we discuss diseases in wildlife. We joined Dr. Kurt Vandegrift in the field to learn how research is conducted using ticks and mice, and how he is trying to prevent the next big epidemic. Next, we speak with Dr. Marilyn Roossinck about white-nose syndrome and it is endangering little brown bats.

An insect infected with Metarhizium robertsii fungus. A USDA organic agriculture grant recently awarded to Penn State will support research on enlisting M. robertsii to assist in plant growth and pest management. IMAGE: COURTESY OF MARY BARBERCHECK
November 18, 2019

Three organic-agriculture projects led by faculty members in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences have received grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Soil bacteria isolated from the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Penn State, Rock Springs, PA. Photo credit: Caylon Yates, Penn State Microbiome Manipulation Lab
October 21, 2019

Researchers from the Penn State Microbiome Manipulation Lab are interested in the effects of plant-associated microbiomes on crop productivity.

IMAGE: PENN STATE
October 17, 2019

Two graduate students from South Africa recently had the opportunity to expand their research, develop a mentorship network and increase multicultural fluency as a result of a strategic partnership between the Department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences and the Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) at the University of Pretoria.

This photo illustrates bacterial leaf spot symptoms on watermelon caused by Pseudomonas syringae. A USDA grant awarded to Penn State will support researchers as they explore bacterial pathogens causing leaf spot diseases.  IMAGE: ERIC NEWBERRY
October 3, 2019

A nearly $4 million grant awarded to Penn State will support an interdisciplinary, multi-university team of researchers as they explore bacterial pathogens causing leaf spot diseases that are damaging valuable agricultural crops such as watermelon and pumpkin.

Citrus greening on a pomelo tree. IMAGE: FLORIDA DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES, BUGWOOD.ORG
June 14, 2019

Tim McNellis, an associate professor in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences, received a $171,000 grant from the Citrus Research and Development Foundation to research citrus greening resistance.

Kevin Hockett
May 31, 2019

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) recently awarded Kevin Hockett $453,000 to assist in research focusing on how microbes tolerate distinct stresses.

Laura Kaminsky, a doctoral student in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. IMAGE: PENN STATE
May 13, 2019

Laura Kaminsky, a doctoral student in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences, will be able to advance her research interests in plant pathology after receiving a grant from the National Science Foundation.

December 6, 2017

Dr. David Beyer is principal investigator on grant to develop organic management options for three most challenging mushroom pests.

Image: Randy Dreibelbis, Penn State
September 9, 2017

Penn State's Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center, which includes Plant Pathology Farm, is hub for cutting-edge research and education.